Professor Ingo Sorke, who also served on the General Conference Theology of Ordination Study Committee (TOSC), considers the question of whether the Bible teaches gender differentiation. Several texts are reviewed, including in Genesis 1, Romans 16, 1 Corinthians 11, 14, Galatians 3, Ephesians 5, 1 Timothy 3, 1 Peter 2, 5. Sorke also appeals to males to be godly males and to lead in a way that honors the Scriptures. Sorke shares what happened in a secular class when women read these Bible passages without commentary. Finally, he makes a striking appeal to Christian men at the video’s conclusion. We believe that many persons will want to see this brief video. Tell your friends and share the link!

Pastors Larry Kirkpatrick and Mike Lambert discuss “NAD’s cultural WO solution.” Although the North American Division has packaged the adoption of women’s ordination as being a biblical necessity, the solution they insist upon for the church is strangely identical to the one offered by Lutheran scholar John H.P. Reumann to ELCA in 1987—just three years before the original attempt by the NAD to introduce WO to the world field in 1990 GC session. The CAP pastors also discuss a most critical hermeneutical admission made by Ruemann—although one that, so far, NAD WO advocates have not acknowledged.

In the January 2014 meeting of the Theology of Ordination Study Commottee (TOSC), several papers were presented. Among these was this short paper prepared by 10 members of the committee. This paper is a concise evaluation of several of the arguments favoring women’s ordination. The ten authors writing this response are Gerhard Pfandl with Daniel Bediako, Steven Bohr, Laurel and Gerard Damsteegt, Jerry Moon, Paul Ratsara, Ed Reynolds, Ingo Sorke, and Clinton Wahlen.

Among other things, this paper addresses the following pro-woman’s ordination arguments advanced by those holding that position:

  1. In Genesis 1 there is full equality in function between man and woman.
  2. Adam and Eve were priests in the pre-fall Eden sanctuary.
  3. Male headship did not exist in the Garden; it is a result of the fall and applies only to the marriage relationship and not to the church.
  4. The qualification lists in 1 Timothy 3 and Titus 1:1-11 are gender neutral.
  5. Junia in Romans 16 was a female apostle.
  6. Galatians 3:26-29 applies not only to salvation, but it also abolishes the subordination of “females to males.”
  7. 1 Timothy 2:12-14 applies only to a specific situation in Ephesus and does not refer to the relationship that should universally exist between men and women.
  8. The priesthood of all believers permits women to be ordained as elders/ministers.
  9. Ministry in the New Testament Church was non-hierarchical.
  10. “Head” in 1 Corinthians 11:2-16 has the meaning of source rather than spiritual authority.

DOWNLOAD THE DOCUMENT HERE IN PDF FORMAT.

In this second of six presentations, Pr. Mike Lambert addresses important texts including Galatians 3:28, 1 Corinthians, and 1 Timothy, especially addressing unity and equality and role distinctions. Pastor Lambert also draws important connections between the home and the church. This sermon was preached at the Stateline Seventh-day Adventist Church in Milton-Freewater, OR.

Mike Lambert, pastor of the Stateline, Oregon, Seventh-day Adventist Church, delivers the first of six presentations—all of which we shall post online over the next few weeks, from his series titled “A gender agenda.” In the series, Pr. Lambert addresses the cluster of texts and arguments favoring and opposing women’s ordination, with associated issues. In this first part, Elder Lambert begins to address Galatians 3:28 but also provides a quick but careful walk through the historic developments of the issue in the Seventh-day Adventist church from its beginning right up to the present. Stateline Church is located immediately south of Walla Walla/College Place, WA.

Pastor Larry Kirkpatrick takes a look at findings prepared by Robert Yarbrough and makes a “surprise” discovery: theological studies supporting Womens’ Ordination published in Theological Journals suddenly change direction in 1969. Who would have imagined that? FIND IT HERE.

Pastor Kirkpatrick continues his in-depth series in part 5. It has often been alleged (and as often denied) that the theology that sustains the ordination of women also leads inevitably to the acceptance of homosexuality in the church. Is this so? What do those pushing for homosexual “rights” in the church themselves say about the hermeneutics and approach to biblical interpretation? THis is another MSUT READ article. FIND IT HERE.