[NOTE from CAP: The following extensive timeline summaries help readers understand the flow of events which over almost half a century led today’s TEC (The Episcopal Church) from a time before it ordained women, to a time when it is ordaining homosexual persons practicing homosexual sin. Readers will benefit from the detailed sequence of events and the section also that lists quotations by leaders in TEC. Those looking for a case study in the outcomes which follow liberation theology need look no farther.]

Compiled By Mary Ann Mueller
VOL Special Correspondent
www.virtueonline.org
May 6, 2016

General Convention Actions

• 1970 Houston, TX — Women first seated in the House of Deputies; deaconesses could be translated into ordained deacons thus opening the door to women as members of the clergy. Convention voted on a measure to authorize women’s priestly ordination. It was approved by the laity but narrowly defeated by clerical deputies.

• 1973 Louisville, KY — The indissolubility of marriage was revoked and a canonical change allowed remarriage of the divorced; authorized continued use of the Services for Trial Use (the Green Book) furthering Prayerbook revision. Convention rejected female ordination for the second time.

• 1976 Minneapolis, MN — Approved priestly ordination of women to the priesthood and episcopate and regularized the “Philadelphia 11” and the “Washington Four.” Declared that homosexuals are “children of God” and are “entitled to full civil rights” The 1976, General Convention, which approved the ordination of women to the priesthood and episcopate, voted to regularize the 15 forerunners.

• 1979 Denver, CO — Approved new Book of Common Prayer; Passed Dennis Canon to provide a trustee relationship with the parish and the larger church so that all parish property is held in trust for the local diocese and the overarching Episcopal Church. Endorses the Equal Rights Amendment and urges states to ratify it; Drops “Protestant” from The Protestant Episcopal Church in the United States of America. (PECUSA) to become the Episcopal Church in the United States of America (ECUSA).

• 1982 New Orleans, LA — Affirmed that homosexual persons are children of God and are entitled to full civil rights.

• 1985 Anaheim, CA — Urged each diocese of this Church to find an effective way to foster a better understanding of homosexual persons, to dispel myths and prejudices about homosexuality, to provide pastoral support.

• 1988 Detroit, MI — Reaffirmed the expectation of chastity and fidelity in relationships; decried the increase of violence against homosexual person; and asked Presiding Bishop Edmond Browning to publicly repudiate the claim that AIDS is the punishment of God upon homosexual persons.

• 1991 Phoenix, AZ — Refused to require that clergy maintain sexual purity outside of marriage while affirming the moral teaching of The Episcopal Church is that physical sexual expression is only appropriate within a lifelong monogamous union of husband and wife, however acknowledged that the Church will continue to work towards legislatively reconciling the explicit teaching of the church with the open experience of its members.

• 1994 Indianapolis, IN — General Convention called for the preparation of a report considering rites for blessings of same-sex unions. Convention affirmed that there is value in the theological position that women should not be ordained. Bishop John Spong (VIII Newark) writes the Statement of Koinonia — advocating same-sex blessings, and the ordaining of non-celibate lesbians and homosexuals — was signed by 68 Episcopal Bishops.

• 1997 Philadelphia, PA — Voted to allow the ordination of women — deacon, priest and bishop — to spread to every diocese by mandating the ordination, licensing, and deployment of women throughout the church stating: “With the passage of this legislation, clergy and laity who do not accept the ordination for women, no longer hold a position that is tolerated by the General Convention of the Church”; Convention defeats by 2-to-1 Resolution B-032 urging the affirmation of the Kuala Lumpur Statement on Human Sexuality; theologically liberal Bishop Frank Griswold (X Chicago) is elected the XXV Presiding Bishop. He was one of 68 bishops who signed Bishop John Spong’s (VIII Newark) Statement of Koinonia. Convention also authorized individual dioceses to offer health insurance benefits to domestic partners of clergy and church employees, both heterosexual and homosexual.

• 2000 Denver, CO — Mandates the enforcement procedures for Women’s ordination in all dioceses. Gives recognition and support to gay and lesbian relationships and places such relationships alongside of traditional Christian marriage; voted to continue dialogue on human sexuality; Judy Collins cancelled a benefit concert for Presiding Bishop’s Fund to protest what she regards as The Episcopal Church’s discriminatory policies against homosexuals.

• 2003 Minneapolis, MN — Vicky Gene Robinson was confirmed by a 60% to 40% margin to be the first openly gay bishop in a partnered relationship in The Episcopal Church. Convention also adopted a “local option” resolution to allow dioceses to permit same-sex blessings a local parish level.

• 2006 Columbus, OH — Election of Katharine Jefferts Schori as 26th Presiding Bishop. She has changed the focus of The Episcopal Church from a spiritual focus to societal matters stressing that social issues are the essence of Christianity. Convention limply responded to the Windsor Report: Dioceses were asked to exercise restraint in ordaining bishops who may cause further strain to the Anglican Communion. The Episcopal Church in The United States of America (ECUSA) changes its common mane to The Episcopal Church (TEC) to reflect its international membership. Following the election of Katharine Jefferts Schori as Presiding Bishop and Primate nine conservative Episcopal dioceses: Fort Worth, Dallas, Quincy, Pittsburgh, San Joaquin, South Carolina, Central Florida, Albany, and Springfield petitioned the Archbishop of Canterbury for Alternative Primatial Oversight (APO).

• 2009 Anaheim, CA — Embraced Indaba, an African-style method of group discussion. Authorized the development of liturgies to bless committed relationships of same-sex couples. Allowed for ordination of any person to any ordained ministry regardless of sexual orientation or practice. Voted to allow bishops to decide whether or not to bless same-sex marriage in their individual diocese.

• 2012 Indianapolis, IN — Added gender expression and identity to canons to prevent transgendered discrimination, allowing that the ordination discernment process is open to the transgendered and guaranteeing the transgendered an equal place in the life, worship and governance of the church. Declined to take a position of the Anglican Covenant preferring to enter into Continuing Indaba — an ongoing and unending discussion which leads to no resolution. Approved the trial use of “The Witnessing and Blessing of a Lifelong Covenant, an official liturgy to bless same-sex couples and their committed unions. Authorized the study of marriage to determine the needs for pastoral responses by clergy for same-sex couples in states where civil marriage is legal, as well as issues “raised by changing societal and cultural norms and legal structures.” Bishop Mark Lawrence (South Carolina XIV) walks out of the House of Bishops and the South Carolina delegation walk out off the Convention floor following the passage of transgendered legislation.

• 2015 Salt Lake City, UT — Convention approved two resolutions A054 which formally approves gender-neutral and same-sex marriage ceremonies; and A036 which changes the marriage canon. The House of Bishops voted to alter Canon I.18 by inserting genderless language and removing any reference to “husband” and “wife” in the Marriage Canon, thus cementing a paradigm shift in the understanding of marriage in The Episcopal Church. The final HOB tally to change TEC’s marriage canon was 129 yeas to 26 nays with five abstaining. The measure was concurred to in a vote by orders in the House of Deputies. Bishop Michael Curry (XI North Carolina) is elected the 27th Presiding Bishop by a landslide on the first ballot. As a powerful black preacher he ushers in the “Jesus Movement” into The Episcopal Church. The first black Presiding Bishop focuses on racial discrimination and white privilege. Seventy-nine bishops, dressed in their white rochets and red chimeres, marched through the streets of Salt Lake City to protest gun violence.

Creeping Gay Rights

• 1974 — Louie Crew founds Integrity-USA — An LGBT advocacy group in The Episcopal Church.

• 1977 — Bishop Paul Moore (XIII New York) ordains Ellen Barrett, first openly female lesbian, as priest.

• 1987 — The Episcopal Church Commission on Health and Human Affairs sparked a debate for equal rights for homosexuals.

• 1987 Diocese of Newark — Released a study document for churches which commended “gay couples to the Church” and suggested “that their sacred commitments be recognized and blessed.” The document also called on Bishop John Spong (VIII Newark) to protect openly homosexual priests and called for homosexuals to be allowed full participation in the ordained ministry of The Episcopal Church.

• 1989 — Bishop John Spong (VIII Newark) ordained Robert Williams , first non-celibate gay man in a committed relationship, to the priesthood.

• 1989 Diocese of Massachusetts — A “covenanted lesbian relationship” was blessed during an Evensong at St. John the Evangelist Church in Boston.

• 1990 — Bishop Walter Righter (Assistant Newark) ordains Barry Stopfel, a non-celibate partnered homosexual male, to the diaconate. A presentment was brought against him for teaching a doctrine contrary to The Episcopal Church and violating his vows of ordination to conform with the doctrine of The Episcopal Church.

• 1991 Diocese of Maryland — The same-sex blessing of two lesbians at a Baltimore Episcopal parish.

• 1991 — Both Bishop Edward Jones (IX Indianapolis) and Bishop Stewart Wood (IX Michigan) admitted to the House of Bishops to having ordained non-celibate homosexuals.

• 1991 — Bishop Allen Bartlett (XIV Pennsylvania) ordains James Robertson, an openly gay male to the vocational diaconate.

• 1991 Diocese of El Camino Real — Same-sex blessing occurs at Trinity Episcopal Cathedral in San Jose.

• 1992 Diocese of Michigan — A same-sex lesbian blessing was held in Detroit while a second same-sex gay blessing was held in East Lansing. Bishop Stewart Wood (IX Michigan) supported both ceremonies.

• 1992 Diocese of Los Angeles — Two homosexual men made “marriage vows” to “love, honor and comfort each other” at an Episcopal church in Pasadena.

• 1992 — More than 50 Episcopal congregations indicated they openly welcome lesbians and gays as members.

• 1993 — Bishop Otis Charles (VIII Utah) admits to the House of Bishops he is gay. He was the first bishop in any denomination to come out of the closet and admit he was gay.

• 1993 — Bishop James Jelinek (VIII Minnesota) announces he will ordain homosexuals if they meet the other canonical requirements for ordination.

• 1994 — Standing Commission on Human Affairs publishes wish list that calls for continued dialogue on human sexuality; gays and lesbians to be increasingly welcomed by churches.; an increase in lesbian and gay members come out of the closet; church to fight for homosexual civil rights; and to speak out against “gay bashing.”

• 1994 — Bishop William Burrill (VI Rochester) ordains homosexual Roderick Thompson priest in Portland, Oregon.

• 1994 — Bishop Steward Wood (IX Michigan) ordains a practicing lesbian Jennifer Walters a priest.

• 1994 — Bishop Allen Bartlett (XIV Pennsylvania) ordains David John Morse, an avowed non-celibate homosexual, to the diaconate.

• 1994 Diocese of Massachusetts — Thomas Shaw, SSJE, (XV Massachusetts) a celibate gay monk with the Episcopal monistic order of Society of St. John the Evangelist is elected bishop.

• 1996 Diocese of Pennsylvania — The diocesan convention recommends that The Episcopal Church create “a rite or rites for the blessing of committed relationships between persons of the same sex.”

• 1996 — The National Consultation of Episcopalians on Same-Sex Unions developed a “A Rite for the Celebration of Commitment to a Life Together.”

• 1997 Alexandra, VA — Virginia Theological Seminary issues new policy statement indicating that sexual orientation nor identity will bar a person from admission.

• 1998 — While the XIII Lambeth Conference upholds Scriptural and traditional teaching on marriage and human sexuality, Episcopal Church bishops sign a pastoral statement affirming lesbian and gay Anglicans.

• 1998 Kalamazoo, MI — Two homosexual priests (one gay and one lesbian) were ordained by Bishop Edward Lee (VII Western Michigan) amid protests. Bishop Lee said that the candidates had fulfilled all canonical requirements and had been recommended for ordination while acknowledging that The Episcopal Church had not reached a consensus on this issue, and that continued dialogue was needed.

• 1998 Diocese of Los Angeles — Rejects The Lambeth Declaration which calls homosexuality incompatible with Scripture. The Diocese says that as “Episcopalians in California they won’t condemn homosexuality.”

• 2000 — The Episcopal Church’s Standing Commission on Liturgy and Music issued a report dealing with same-sex unions. It recommends a form of local option in which area dioceses would “find their own way in the matter.” However the recommendation was only a suggestion since local dioceses were free to follow this advice.

• 2003 — Presiding Bishop Frank Griswold Church filed an amicus curiae brief with the U.S. Supreme Court in opposition to a Texas anti-gay which criminalizes certain sexual activities by same-sex couples which are legal for opposite-sex couples.

• 2004 — Los Angeles, CA — Bishop Jon Bruno (VI Los Angeles) conducts a union ritual for the noted gay activist priest and author the Rev. Canon Malcolm Boyd, poet laureate of LA, and his long-time partner Mark Thompson.

• 2004 — Diocese of Washington — Bishop John Chane (VIII Washington) conducts same sex-blessing of former Integrity-USA President Michael Hopkins and his partner John Bradley to coincide with Gay Pride Day in Washington DC. It was Bishop Chane’s first blessing of a same-sex couple.

• 2004 — Open practicing homosexual Bishop Vicky Gene Robinson (IX New Hampshire) consecrated bishop. He is The Episcopal Church’s first professed openly gay bishop in a partnered relationship. He came out of the closet in the mid ’80s.

• 2004 Diocese of Massachusetts — Bishop Thomas Shaw, SSJE (XV (Massachusetts), a celibate gay monk, ordains transmale Katherine Cameron Partridge to the priesthood and she becomes Fr. Cameron Partridge and is appointed the Episcopal Chaplain at Boston University.

• 2008 — San Francisco, CA — Bishop Otis Charles (VIII Utah), the first gay bishop to come out of the closet, marries his gay partner Felipe Sanchez-Paris in an Episcopal same-sex ceremony.

• 2004 — Various Episcopal bishops announced their permission for the use of Same-Sex Blessings in their dioceses. Bishop Marc Andrus (VIII California); Bishop Jon Bruno (VI Los Angeles); Bishop Michael Curry (XI North Carolina); Bishop Katharine Jeffers Schori (III Nevada); Bishop Carolyn Tanner Irish (X Utah); and Thomas Ely (X Vermont).

• 2004 — Four bishops Thomas Shaw, SSJE (XV (Massachusetts); Robert O’Neill (X Colorado CO); Clark Grew (X Ohio); and Don Johnson (III West Tennessee) flew to London to talk with Archbishop of Canterbury Rowan Williams. They have been disturbed at rumors that the Lambeth Commission may recommend that The Episcopal Church be excluded from policy making and shunned because of the consecration of Bishop Vicky Gene Robinson (IX New Hampshire).

• 2004 Washington, DC — Bishop Vicky Gene Robinson (IX New Hampshire) give an invocation at President Barack Obama’s opening inaugural event.

• 2008 San Francisco, CA — Bishop Otis Charles (VIII Utah), the first gay bishop to come out of the closet, legally marries his gay partner Felipe Sanchez-Paris.

• 2008 Concord, NH — Bishop Vicky Gene Robinson (IX New Hampshire) and his gay partner Mark Andrew are united in a civil ceremony then the gay couple’s union is blessed at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church.

• 2010 Diocese of Los Angeles — A partnered lesbian Canon Mary Glasspool (Los Angeles Suffragan) is consecrated as bishop.

• 2010 Santa Fe, NM — Gay Bishop Gene Robinson (IX New Hampshire) is honorary Grand Marshal for the Gay Pride Parade.

• 2010 — Integrity-USA Integrity endorses Believe Out Loud Program, a trans-denominational “branding” of congregations that are welcoming and affirming of LGBT persons

• 2011 Portland, OR — Michael Hanley (X Oregon) marches in Gay Pride Parade .

• 2012 — Same-Sex Blessing fever spreads throughout The Episcopal Church with more than two thirds of the domestic dioceses giving their blessing to partnered same-gender relationships.

• 2012 Boston, MA — New England Bishops Vicky Gene Robinson (IX New Hampshire);Thomas Shaw (XV Massachusetts); and Stephen Lane (IX Maine) march in Gay Pride Parade in celebration of Gay Pride Week.

• 2012 — Bishop Thomas Shaw, SSJE (XV Massachusetts) discusses his being a gay celibate monk, priest and bishop on England Bishop Vicky Gene Robinson’s (IX New Hampshire) Live Free or Die documentary.

• 2012 — Bishop Vicky Gene Robinson (IX New Hampshire) documentary Live Free or Die takes center stage at the Sundance Film Festival. It is later played on Public Broadcasting System (PBS).

• 2013 — Religion & Politics, an online news journal, reveals that there are at least seven openly transgendered ordained clergy in The Episcopal Church.

• 2013 Diocese of New Hampshire — Bishop Vicky Gene Robinson (IX New Hampshire) retires as bishop. He becomes a Senior Fellow at the Center for American Progress a liberal think tank in Washington, DC.

• 2013 — Bishops Otis Charles (VIII Utah) becomes the first gay Episcopal bishop to be “widowed” following the death of his same-sex partner.

• 2014 Washington, DC — Bishop Vicky Gene Robinson, The Episcopal Church’s poster boy for same-sex marriage, announces his divorce from his “husband” Mark Andrew. He pleads for privacy. Following the divorce Bishop Robinson is seen wearing an ear stud ear stud in his right earlobe announcing to the world he is gay, he is single and he is available.

• 2014 Washington, DC — Cameron Partridge the transmale priest at Boston University preaches at the National Cathedral.

• 2014 Diocese of Arkansas — Fr. Grey Fry, a married male priest, shocks his congregation at Grace Episcopal Church in Pine Bluff, announcing from the pulpit that he is a now a transfemale and to please call him “Gwen.” By midweek Bishop Larry Benfield (XIII Arkansas) strips Fry of his pulpit to allow him to transgender in peace.

• 2015 — The US Supreme Court by a 5 to 4 vote makes gay marriage the law of the land. Various Episcopal Church bishops issued statements celebrating the Supreme Court’s marriage equality ruling. The President Barack Obama lights the White House up in Gay Pride colors.

Liberalization of The Episcopal Church

• 1971 — Episcopal Women’s Caucus founded to promote feminist causes. It is a national group – lay women, clergy, seminarians and professional church workers – formed to actualize the full participation of women at all levels of ministry and decision making.

• 1980 — Episcopal priest uses Coke and toast to celebrate Rite III Agape meal in a private non-public Service of Holy Communion.

• 1987 Diocese of Newark — Diocesan convention urges The Episcopal Church to “acknowledge and affirm non-marital sexual relationships between homosexuals and between single, divorced and widowed adults.”

• 1987 — In a report by the Standing Liturgical Commission of The Episcopal Church calls for the dropping of Trinitarian language wherever possible except for the Creed and the Lord’s Prayer. The Commission also developed an alternative Eucharistic rite for “The Nurturing God.”

• 1987 — In a report giving to the House of Bishops, the Episcopal Bishops were told that “homosexuality was probably determined even before birth and should be considered outside the scope of moral judgment.”

• 1990 — Diocese of Washington Task Force on Human Sexuality concludes that guidelines about homosexual behavior in the Scriptures was not present. The report contends that modern exegetical scholarship reveals a different meaning on passages in the Bible than previously thought. The report concluded that the Genesis story of Sodom involved a “breach of hospitality”; the Leviticus holiness code is “not binding on Christians”; Christ’s remarks in Matthew “did not specifically condemn homosexual activity”; and Paul’s real concern in Romans about “unnatural behavior” really meant “homosexuals participating in heterosexual relationships.”

• 1990 — Bishop Frederick Borsch (V Los Angeles) tells the Episcopal House of Bishops that “the Bible does not provide a definitive answer to the question of homosexual orientation” and that the church needs to continue to seek understanding from the Scriptures.

• 1993 Diocese of New York — Elements of pagan worship begin to appear in a service celebrated by Bishop Richard Grein (XIV New York) held at the Cathedral of John the Divine in New York City.

• 1993 — Bishop Steven Plummer (II Navajoland) receives medical and psychological therapy consisting of Christian prayer, modern psychology and traditional Navajo ways following his revelation that he had sexually abused with a minor male.

• 1993 Diocese of Chicago — The rector and vestry of the Episcopal Church of the Resurrection in West Chicago, Ill informed Bishop Franck Griswold (X Chicago) that they were scandalized by the Diocese of Chicago’s abandonment of Scriptures and the perception that “priests practicing homosexual behavior were given influential positions. The church disassociated with the Episcopal Diocese of Chicago.

• 1994 New York City, NY — General Theological Seminary institutes a new housing directive allowing for “committed” same-sex couples to living in campus apartments.

• 1994 Diocese of California — Grace Episcopal Cathedral in San Francisco celebrates the “Renaissance of the Divine Feminine” highlighting Kali Durga, a Hindu goddess of transformation; Isis, an Egyptian goddess of motherhood, magic and fertility; Tara, the Tibetan goddess of compassion, and the Virgin Mary as a Black Madonna.

• 1994 — The House of Bishops said it is unable to reach an agreement on the pastoral teaching concerning human sexuality and issued a study document.

• 1994 — Bishop John Spong pens and signed by 90 Episcopal bishops The Statement of Koinonia where he asserts that “those who know themselves to be gay or lesbian persons, and who do not choose to live alone, but forge relationships with partners of their choice that are faithful, monogamous, committed , life-giving and holy are to be honored.”

• 1995 — As a part of the restructuring The Episcopal Church eliminates missionaries to the South American Missionary Society (SCMS/USA).

• 1995 — Bishop David Johnson (XIV Massachusetts) commits suicide amid growing suspicion that he was involved in a variety of extramarital affairs and engaged in sexual harassment.

• 1995 — The Jesus Seminar, a group of 150 critical biblical scholars determine that there is no evidence to support the Virgin Birth of Christ, His Death on the Cross, nor His physical Resurrection from the Tomb.

• 1995 — A subcommittee of the Standing Liturgical Commission of The Episcopal Church develops an unofficial “liturgy for non-procreative unions — homosexual and heterosexual.”

• 1995 Cambridge, Massachusetts — Pagan and Wicca worship have been introduced to the Episcopal Divinity School. “A Conversation about Wicca and a Short Beltane Ritual” were celebrated by a “transgendered wiccan clergyman-woman named Laurie.

• 1996 — The House of Bishops was exonerated Bishop Walter Righter Assistant Newark) for ordaining a non-celibate homosexual male to the diaconate. It was determined that Bishop Righter did not violated any stated doctrine of The Episcopal Church, including the church’s doctrine on marriage.

• 1996 — House of Deputies’ President Pamela Chinnis decries The Episcopal Church’s slow toward diversity and wholeness. She lobbied for inclusive, non-sexist “God language” and that women have been “devalued, dismissed and denied,” and as a result women were “discouraged, refused and reviled.”

• 1996 — Presiding Bishop Edmond Browning issues a statement in support of President Bill Clinton’s veto of the partial birth abortion ban which kills viable babies still in the womb and then deliver a dead child.

• 2000 — Bishop William Swing (VII California) champions the social gospel through the establishment of the United Religions Initiative (URI) an international non-government organization (NGO) with cooperation circles worldwide for people of diverse religions, spiritual expressions and indigenous traditions to promote interfaith cooperation and create a culture of peace, justice and healing.

• 2000 — At the House of Bishops Spring meeting the participants agreed only to discuss the things they agreed upon and not discuss matters which divide them

• 2000 — The New Commandment Task Force, co-founded by Louie Crew, began to promote reconciliation in The Episcopal Church by teaching church members must be “more loving in their words and actions towards each other as they deal with their disagreements” especially in issues revolving around human sexuality.

• 2003 Baltimore, MD — The Episcopal U2Charist, focusing on Millennium Development Goals, starts the Diocese of Maryland’s St. Mary’s Outreach Center and spreads worldwide

• 2004 — Liberal members of The Episcopal Church found “The Episcopal Majority” in order to sustain and build up The Episcopal Church

• 2004 — TransEpiscopal, a support and advocacy group for transgendered Episcopalians was founded to lobby for Trans-friendly legislation at General Convention.

• 2004 — The House of Bishops attempted to provide a plan for Delegated Episcopal Pastoral Oversight (DEPO) for conservative and traditional parishes in conflict with their more liberally-minded diocesan bishops on theological, ecclesiological and pastoral levels . However the plan was deemed “woefully inadequate” since in required the permission of the diocesan bishop ordinary to be implemented.

• 2004 Washington, DC — Members of the Episcopal Church participate in “March for Women’s Lives.” feminist pro-choice/pro-abortion march.

• 2006 San Francisco, CA — Episcopal Bishop Marc Andres (VIII California) was arrested for blocking the front door of the San Francisco federal building to protest the deaths caused by the Iraq war.

• 2006 Manhattan, NY — Trinity – Wall Street celebrates a “Clown Mass.”

• 2007 –The “Chicago Consultation” formed to foster the “Full Inclusion” of gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgendered Christians into full sacramental life and leadership of The Episcopal Church.

• 2009 Diocese of Northern Michigan — Kevin Thew Forrester, an Episcopal priest and practicing Zen Buddhist, was elected as bishop. However, he failed to receive the required consent votes in both the House of Bishops and diocesan Standing Committees for consecration

• 2009 Cambridge, Massachusetts — Dr. Katherine Ragsdale, a progressive lesbian Episcopal priest and strong advocate for LGBT rights and abortions and was named the president and dean of the Episcopal Divinity School.

• 2010 — The American Anglican Council identifies at least 400 deacons, priests and bishops who have been inhibited, deposed or removed from the exercise of their ordained ministries.

• 2010 Asheville, NC — Members of Mother Grove Goddess Temple celebrated the spring equinox in the parish hall of the Episcopal Diocese of North Carolina’s Cathedral of All Souls in Biltmore Village.

• 2010 Pittsburgh, PA — “Seusscharist” (Dr. Seuss Mass) is celebrated at Calvary Episcopal Church

• 2011 — The Title IV disciplinary process is launched against Bishop Mark Lawrence (XIV South Carolina) as he faced charges of Abandonment of Communion. He was later cleared of those charged because the Disciplinary Board for Bishops “was unable to make the conclusions essential to a certification that Bishop Lawrence had abandoned the communion of the church.”

• 2011 Manhattan, NY — Episcopal Bishop George Packard (V Armed Forces Suffragan) was arrested for trespassing on Trinity-Wall Street property for scaling a fence at Duarte Square during a Occupy Wall Street demonstration.

• 2011 Manhattan, NY — Trinity – Wall Street celebrates a “Pirate Mass.”

• 2012 Washington, DC — Dr. Katherine Ragsdale Dean of the Episcopal Divinity School tells a US House of Representatives Judiciary Subcommittee on the Constitution in opposition to the Child Interstate Abortion Notification Act that she would break the law to help an underage girl get an abortion.

• 2012 Wilmington, DE — The first civil union in the state of Delaware took place January 1 at Trinity Episcopal Church

• 2012 — Voices of Witness: Out of the Box, a video documentary about transgender people was jointly produced by Integrity-USA and TransEpsicopal and was made available to the House of Bishops and the House of Deputies at General Convention.

• 2012 San Francisco CA — Episcopal California Bishop Marc Andrus (VIII California) backhandedly welcomed the new San Francisco Roman Catholic Salvatore Cordileone (IX San Francisco) to the neighborhood stressing the wonders of The Episcopal Church’s Millennium Development Goals and chastising him for his “oppression of gays.” The Episcopal Bishop was then late for the Archbishop’s enthronement, missing the procession storming out when he was not immediately seated.

• 2013 — Various Episcopal bishops who welcomed the passage of same-sex marriage laws in their states include: Bishop Nicholas Knisely (XIII Rhode Island); Bishop Wayne Wright (X Delaware); Bishop William Franklin (XI Western new York) ; Bishop Mark Sisk (XV New York); Lawrence Provenzano (VIII Long Island); Bishop Prince Singh (VIII Rochester); and Bishop Skip Adams (X Central New York).

• 2013 UTOGate — The Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society’s (The Episcopal Church’s corporate identity) takes over the control and management of the United Thank Offering (UTO) resulting in the resignation of the UTO president and several board members. Since 1889 UTO is the Episcopal Church Women’s (ECW) annual autonomous collection for it missionary efforts within The Episcopal Church.

• 2013 Wilmington, DE — The first civil union in the state of Delaware took place Jan. 1, 2012 at Trinity Episcopal Church in Wilmington.

• 2013 — Virtue Online identifies at least 700 deacons, priests and bishops who have been inhibited, deposed or removed their ministries. These inhibitions and deposing are scattered throughout the various dioceses of The Episcopal Church including but not limited to: Atlanta, Connecticut, East Carolina, Florida, Indianapolis, Kansas, Kentucky, Los Angeles, Massachusetts, Michigan, Milwaukee, Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, Mississippi, New York, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Quincy, Rio Grande, Rochester, San Diego, South Carolina, Southern Virginia, Tennessee, West Tennessee, Virginia …

• 2014 — Allan Haley, a California attorney and canon lawyer, has tracked at least 83 court cases since 2000 in where The Episcopal Church, or an Episcopal diocese, has initiated lawsuits against departing and realigning Episcopal congregations or dioceses. Another seven cases were brought to court by departing parishes or dioceses to maintain and protect their properties and finances. The Episcopal Church and its remnant dioceses — Fort Worth, Pittsburgh, South Carolina, Quincy and San Joaquin — have spent in excess of $40 million in litigation, court costs and attorneys’ fees. The Episcopal Church has prevailed in many cases with parishes having to turn over their properties to the smaller remnant congregation. It may take years, and untold amounts of money, for all the litigation to work its way through the various courts.

• 2014 Washington, DC — The National Cathedral holds a Friday Muslim Jumu’ah prayer service. It was organized by the Cathedral’s Director of Liturgy. Canon Gina Gilland Campbell.

• 2014 — Bishops Anne Hodges-Copple (North Carolina-Suffragan); Porter Taylor (VI Western North Carolina); Robert Skirving (VIII East Carolina); and Peter James Lee (XII Virginia-retired) pen a letter stating that North Carolina General Assembly HB2 is “overtly discriminates against LGBT people …” HB2 states that public bathroom usage is determined by a person’s biological sex at birth.

• 2015 Washington, DC — Both MSNBC a d CNN turn Bishop Vicky Gene Robinson (IX New Hampshire) to interpret Catholic theology and comment on Pope Francis’ visit to the United States. He is one of several controversial guests to witness the Pope’s White House visit.

Women’s Ordination

• 1965 — Bishop James Pike (V California) ordains Phyllis Edwards as the first woman deacon, rather than deaconess, in the Protestant Episcopal Church in the United States of America (PECUSA).

• 1970 — LXIII General Convention made it possible for deaconesses to be translated into ordained deacons the first road to ordination as priests and eventually bishops

• 1971 — Episcopal women begin to be ordained deacon alongside men.

• 1973 — Qualified women deacons were presented alongside men for ordination to the priesthood in New York. The bishop refused to ordain the women.

• 1974 Philadelphia, PA — On July 29 the “Philadelphia 11” were irregularly ordained priests by four retired Episcopal bishops Daniel Corrigan (Colorado Suffragan); Robert DeWitt (XII Pennsylvania); Edward R. Welles II (IV West Missouri); and Antonio Ramos (II Costa Rica). The women’s ordinations were denounced as invalid by the House of Bishops on Aug. 15. The ordaining bishops were censured by the House of Bishops for “violation of collegiality.” Charles Willie resigns as vice president of House of Deputies in protest. Those who were ordained were: Merrill Bittner, Alla Bozarth, Alison Cheek, Emily Hewitt, Carter Heyward, Suzanne Hiatt, Marie Fleischer, Janette Piccard, Betty Schiess, Katrina Swanson and Nancy Wittig. On Oct. 27 Alison Cheek, Carter Heyward and Jeannette Piccard celebrate their first public Episcopal Eucharist at New York City’s Riverside Church.

• 1975 Washington, DC — On Sept. 7 the “Washington Four” were irregularly ordained priests by Bishop George Barrett (IV Rochester). Presiding Bishop John Allin spoke out against this second set of ordinations, declaring that Bishop Barrett had defied canon law. He was censured by the House of Bishops. Those ordained were: Eleanor McGee; Alison Palmer; Betty Rosenberg; and Diane Tickell.

• 1977 — Women’s ordination becomes canonically legal. The women-priests ordained in Philadelphia and Washington begin to be “regularized” and regular ordinations of women to the priesthood begin. More than 40 women were ordain in January and nearly 100 were ordained by year’s end. Beverly Messenger-Harris (ordained priest 1977) becomes first woman rector at Gethsemane Episcopal Church in Sherrill, NY. Sr. Mary Michael Simpson, OHS, (ordained priest 1977) becomes the first female resident cathedral canon at the Cathedral of St. John the Divine in New York. She was the first Episcopal religious (nun) sister to become a priest.

• 1978 — Lambeth accepts women’s ordination The Lambeth Conference accepts female ordination as an option at the discretion of the local province but recommends no province consecrate a woman bishop “without consultation with the Primates and overwhelming [local] support.” Sr. Canon Mary Michael Simpson, OSH, (ordained priest 1977) is the first female priest to preach at Westminster Abby in London. She helped to found the Movement for the Ordination of Women which pushed for women’s ordination in the Church of England.

• 1979 — Sr. Mary Michael Simpson, OSH, (ordained priest 1977) is the first female candidate for bishop suffragan in the Diocese of New York. She is a professed member (life profession 1956) of the Order of St. Helena, an Episcopal monastic women’s community. The Motherhouse is in Vales Gate, NY. and a canon at the Cathedral of St. John the Divine in New York.

• 1985 — The Episcopal House of Bishops vote not to withhold consent for woman bishops

• 1987 — Geralyn Wolf (ordained priest 1977) becomes first cathedral dean at Christ Church Cathedral in Louisville KY.

• 1987 — The Episcopal House of Bishops were told to make suitable provision for opponents to the eventual consecration of women bishops so that the dissenters would not leave the church.

• 1988 — XII Lambeth Conference issued a statement on Women in the Episcopate which allowed for individual provinces, including The Episcopal Church, to act on their own regarding women in the episcopate. Barbara Harris (ordained priest 1980) is elected Bishop Suffragan of Massachusetts.

• 1989 Diocese of Massachusetts — Barbara Harris (Massachusetts Suffragan) was consecrated as the first female bishop in The Episcopal Church and the Anglican Communion

• 1991 — Bishop Ronald Haines (VII Washington) ordains Elizabeth Carl, an avowed lesbian living in an intimate relationship with another woman

• 1992 Diocese of Washington — Jane Dixon (Washington Suffragan) infamously said that the prized aspect of women in the episcopacy was the power and authority to make decisions. She was the second woman bishop consecrated in The Episcopal Church.

• 1993 Diocese of Vermont — Bishop Mary Adelia McLeod (IX Vermont) was consecrated as the first female diocesan bishop in The Episcopal Church.

• 1994 — Bishop Stewart Wood (IX Michigan) ordains Jennifer Waters, an openly practicing lesbian, as priest.

• 1994 — Three women bishops joined the Episcopal House of Bishops: Catherine Roskam (New York Suffragan); Geralyn Wolf (XII Rhode Island); and Carolyn Tanner Irish (X Utah).

• 1997 Diocese of Indianapolis — Catherine Waynick (X Indianapolis) becomes bishop

• 1998 Diocese of Eau Claire — Mary Caucutt , a woman-priest, celebrates the Eucharist at Christ Church Cathedral. Bishop William Wantland (IV Eau Claire), while opposed to the ordination of women to the priesthood and episcopate, said that he would not prevent the offering of an invitation to a woman-priest to celebrate the Eucharist in the Diocese after the diocesan Executive Council repealed all prohibitions against women-priests in the Diocese.

• 1998 Diocese of Maine — Chilton Knudsen (VIII Maine) becomes bishop

• 1999 — Only four diocesan bishops still prohibit the ordination of women to the priesthood in their dioceses: Bishop William Wantland (IV Eau Claire); Bishop John-David Schofield (IV San Joaquin); Bishop Keith Ackerman (VIII Quincy); and Bishop Jack Iker (III Fort Worth).

• 2001 Accokeek, Maryland — Bishop Jane Dixon (Washington Pro Tempore) was successful in her bid to prevent Anglo-Catholic priest Fr. Samuel Edwards, who opposed women’s ordination and homosexual clergy, from becoming rector of St. John’s Parish. Bishop Dixon violated Episcopal canons by waiting 59 days past the 30-day deadline to object to Fr. Edwards call as rector. This demonstrated that bishops have absolute power to interpret, ignore or disregard the canons in their dioceses. 26 Episcopal bishops filed an Amicus Curiae brief in support of The Episcopal Church’s hierarchical claim with the US Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals in support of Bishop Dixon’s preventing Fr. Edwards from assuming the rectorship.

• 2001 Diocese of Nevada — Katharine Jefferts Schori (III Nevada) becomes bishop

• 2002 Diocese of Southern Virginia — Carol Gallagher (Southern Virginia Suffragan) becomes bishop

• 2002 Diocese of Quincy — Bishop Keith Ackerman (VIII Quincy) allows three women-priests to come into the Diocese on three separate occasions to officiated at a wedding, a baptism, and a funeral. However Bishop Ackerman forbids the ordination of women-priests in his diocese.

• 2002 — An Episcopal task force reveals that at least one in four Episcopal priests church-wide are women.

• 2003 Diocese of Eau Claire — Keith Whitmore (V Eau Claire) ordains Deacon Joy Ann Rose and Deacon Leigh Waggoner to the priesthood.

• 2003 Diocese of Massachusetts — Gayle Harris (VI Massachusetts Suffragan) becomes bishop. There is no relationship to Bishop Barbara Harris (Massachusetts Suffragan) She is the second female bishop consecrated for the diocese

• 2005 Diocese of Olympia — Bishop Bavi “Nedi” Rivera (Olympia Suffragan) becomes bishop

• 2006 Diocese of Texas — Dena Harrison (Texas Suffragan) becomes bishop

• 2006 — Katharine Jefferts Schori (III Nevada) breaks through the stained glass ceiling as the first woman in the Anglican Communion to be elected as head of an Anglican province when she was elected the XXVI Presiding Bishop and Primate of The Episcopal Church

• 2007 — Two women join the Episcopal House of Bishops: Laura Ahrens (Connecticut Suffragan); and Mary Gray-Reeves (III El Camino Real)

• 2009 — Deacon Suzanne Ward becomes the first woman-priest ordained by Bishop Jerry Lamb (I Provisional TEC San Joaquin) in the TEC Diocese of San Joaquin while Deacon Susan Slaughter was ordained by Bishop Edwin Gulick (I Provisional TEC Fort Worth) as the first woman-priest in the TEC Diocese of Fort Worth. The Diocese of Quincy remains the only Episcopal diocese which refuses to ordain women to the priesthood.

• 2010 Diocese of Los Angeles — Two women are consecrated bishop on the same day: Diane Bruce, Los Angeles Suffragan) and partnered lesbian Mary Glasspool (Los Angeles Suffragan)

• 2010 TEC Diocese of Quincy — Deacon Margaret “Peggy” Lee is ordained by Bishop John Buchanan (Provisional TEC Quincy) as the first woman priest in the last noncompliant diocese to accept women’s ordination . Her ordination spread women-priests to all 110 dioceses in The Episcopal Church.

• 2010 Mitregate — Episcopal Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori chaffs at English law which prevented her from wearing her mitre at London’s Southwark Cathedral because the Church of England does not consecrate women bishops. She called the parliamentary rules that govern the ministry of visiting clergy “bizarre” and “nonsense.” She carried her folded mitre during the procession rather than leave it behind.

• 2011 Diocese of Washington — Marianne Budde (IX Washington) becomes a bishop. She is the second female bishop consecrated for the diocese

• 2012 Diocese of Virginia — Susan Goff (Virginia Suffragan) becomes bishop

• 2013 Diocese of North Carolina — Anne Hodges-Copple (North Carolina Suffragan) becomes bishop.

• 2014 Diocese of Maryland — Heather Cook (Maryland Suffragan) is elected bishop in an all female slate of candidates.

• 2015 Diocese of Maryland — Heather Cook (Maryland Suffragan) is involved in a drunken fatal hit-and-run accident in Baltimore, MD leaving a bicyclist dead in the street. She is placed on administrative leave by Bishop Eugene Sutton (XIV Maryland). A Title IV presentment is launched and she is eventually deposed and stripped of all ordained orders. She is eventually sentenced to seven years at the Maryland Correctional Institute for Women.

• 2015 — Chilton Knudsen (VIII Maine-retired) is sent to England to represent The Episcopal Church at Libby Lane’s consecration as the Church of England’s first female bishop. She was filling in for Katharine Jefferts Schori who was unable to attend because she was leading an Interfaith Abrahamic Pilgrimage in the Holy Land and could not break away.

• 2015 Diocese of Maryland — Chilton Knudsen (VIII Maine-retired), a recovering alcoholic, is chosen as assistant bishop to replace Heather Cook.

• 2015 Diocese of Central Pennsylvania — Audrey Scanlan (XI Central Pennsylvania) becomes bishop. She is the 22nd female bishop in The Episcopal Church.

• 2016 Diocese of Virginia — Susan Goff (Virginia Suffragan) is appointed and commissioned as an Assisting Bishop in Liverpool, England. The appointment is approved by both Archbishop of York John Sentamu and Presiding Bishop Michael Curry.

• 2016 — The Episcopal Church decries that there are not enough women bishops in power. Most of the female bishops elected are as suffragan or assistant bishops. Many of the early women diocesan bishops have retired.

Clerical Inhabitations, Depositions & Renunciations

[NOTE ADDED BY ORDINATIONTRUTH.COM: “According to the constitutions and canons of the Episcopal Church in the United States, Title IV “Ecclesiastical Discipline”, there are three modes of depriving a member of clergy from exercising ministerial rights: inhibition, suspension, or deposition. Inhibitions and suspensions are temporary. Clergy who are deposed are “deprived of the right to exercise the gifts and spiritual authority of God’s word and sacraments conferred at ordination.” (Title IV, Canon 15, Of Terminology Used in This Section, Deposition). Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Defrocking, accessed 2016-05-09]

• 1977 Oakland, CA — Bishop Kilmer Myers (VI California) deposes Fr. Robert Morse rector at St. Peter’s Episcopal Church for abandoning the ministry of The Episcopal Church. Following the deposition the California bishop that “No loyal Episcopalian or Anglican may receive the sacraments from the Rev. Robert Morse.”

• 1977 Long Island, NY — Bishop Jonathan Sherman (V Long Island) inhibits Canon Albert duBois the executive director of the American Church Union for challenging 1976 General Convention’s action which allowed the ordination of women to the Episcopal priesthood, stating that the unprecedented action “placed the Episcopal Church outside the traditional doctrine, discipline, and worship of Anglicanism.”

• 1977 Denver, CO — Bishop William Frey (VIII Colorado) deposes Fr. James Mote of St. Mary’s Episcopal Church for voting to sever relations with its Episcopal diocese in opposition to the ordination of women. The bishop said Fr. Mote was “released from the obligations of the ministerial office and deprived of the right to exercise the gifts and spiritual authority as a minister of God’s word and sacrament, as conferred upon you at ordination.”

• 1977 Diocese of Los Angeles — Bishop Robert Rusack (IV Los Angeles) deposed the Rev. John Barker and the Rev. Elwood Trigg of St. Mary of the Angels Church in Hollywood; the Rev. William T. St. John Brown of St. Matthias, Sun Valley; the Rev. Forrest Miller of Our Savior’s in Los Angeles; and the Rev. George H. Clendenin of the Church of the Holy Apostles in Glendale “as a culmination of their actions in opposition to the approval of the ordination of women to the priesthood by the 1976 General Convention of the Episcopal Church.”

• 1994 Brockton, MA — Bishop Thomas Shaw (XV Massachusetts) deposes Fr. James Hiles when St. Paul’s disaffiliated from the Episcopal Diocese of Massachusetts and sought Alternative Episcopal Oversight (AEO). Parishioners were evicted from their building.

• 1994 Rosemont, PA — Bishop Charles Bennison, Jr. (XV Pennsylvania) deposes Fr. David Moyer, rector of Good Shepherd Episcopal Church for failing to allow him to make a canonically-required episcopal visit to the parish. Fr. Myer felt Bishop Bennison was “too liberal and could not be trusted in the pulpit,” and denounces the bishop’s teachings as “apostate and heretical.”

• 2002 — Bishop John Lipscomb (IV Southwest Florida) deposes retired priest Fr. Richard Pollard from the Episcopal priesthood following allegations of sexual misconduct.

• 2004 — The House of Bishops deposes Bishop Neptali Moreno (II Central Ecuador) for violating Canon IV.9.1 by “an open renunciation of the Doctrine, Discipline and Worship” of The Episcopal Church and financial irregularities within his South American diocese.

• 2005 Bristol, CT — Bishop Andrew D. Smith, (XIV Connecticut) inhibited Fr. Mark Hansen for abandoning the Communion of the Church and removed him as rector of St. John’s Episcopal Church.

• 2006 Colorado Springs, CO — Bishop Robert O’Neill (X Colorado) inhibited Fr. Don Armstrong, rector of Grace and St. Stephen’s claiming the priest has “misapplied” church funds.

• 2006 — Bishop William Swing (VII California), with consultation of Bishop Jon Bruno (VI Los Angeles) deposes Fr. John Bennison, rector of St. John’s Episcopal Church in Clayton, CA (Diocese of California) for alleged sexual misconduct while a seminarian at St. Mark’s Episcopal Church in Upland, CA (Diocese of Los Angeles). Fr. Bennison is Bishop Charles Bennison Sr.’s (V Western Michigan) son and Bishop Charles Bennison Jr.’s (XV Philadelphia) brother, who at the time was rector of St. Mark’s.

• 2007 Diocese of Virginia — Bishop Peter Lee (XII Virginia) removed 21 of his clergy from ordained ministry in 2007 claiming they have abandoned the Communion. The Virginia bishop explained that the former Episcopal clergy were “released from the obligations of priest or deacon and deprived of the right to exercise the gifts and spiritual authority conferred in ordination.”

• 2007 — Episcopal Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori inhibits Bishop Charles Bennison, Jr. (XV Philadelphia) “from all ordained ministry pending a judgment of the Court for the Trial of a Bishop” as result of his “contemporaneous failure to respond properly” when he learned of his brother’s alleged sexual misconduct and the “subsequent suppression of pertinent information.” At the time (circa mid ’70s) John Bennison, a seminarian, was serving as a youth leader at St. Mark’s in Upland, CA (Diocese of Los Angeles.)

• 2007 — Bishop Daniel W. Herzog (VIII Albany) renounces Holy Orders to become a Roman Catholic. In 2010 he returned to The Episcopal Church and his Holy Orders have been reinstated.

• 2007 — Bishop John Lipscomb (IV Southwest Florida) announced plans to join Roman Catholic Church and feeling the need to be unified with the Church of Rome seeks to be released from Holy Orders and removed from the House of Bishops.

• 2007 — Bishop Jeffrey Steenson (V Rio Grande) announced plans to join Roman Catholic Church feeling the need to seek the Gift of Authority and be in Communion with Peter in the fullness of the Catholic faith seeks to be released from Holy Orders and removed from the House of Bishops.

• 2007 — Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori declared the V. Rev. Mark Lawrence’s election as Bishop of South Carolina null and void for failure to get the required number of Standing Committee consents. Several Standing Committee votes were improperly filed and therefore canonically inadequate.

• 2007 Diocese of Rhode Island Bishop Geralyn Wolf (XII Rhode Island) inhibits Episcopal priest- turned Islam convert Ann Holmes Redding who was canonically resident Rhode Island but serving in Seattle. The African American priest was finally defrocked in 2009, one week after the 25th anniversary of her ordination to the Episcopal priesthood, for failing to return to renounce her Islamic spirituality.

• 2008 Diocese of Florida — Bishop Samuel Howard (VIII Florida) axed 22 of his clergy, 19 priests and three deacons, who sought other Anglican jurisdictions following the consecration of actively gay priest Vicky Gene Robinson as the Bishop of New Hampshire.

• 2008 — Bishop Terence Kelshaw (VII Rio Grande) announced plans to realign with the Anglican Church in Uganda and resigned from the House of Bishops because he no longer felt he was in fellowship with them due to their increasing liberal drift and questioning if The Episcopal Church was even Anglican.

• 2008 — Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori accepts the renunciation of Holy Orders of Bishop David Bena (Albany Suffragan); Bishop Andrew Fairfield (X North Dakota) ; and Howard Meeks (VI Western Michigan). The letter accepting their resignations say that each bishop “is, therefore, removed from the Ordained Ministry of this Church and released from the obligations of all Ministerial offices, and is deprived of the right to exercise the gifts and spiritual authority as a Minister of God’s Word and Sacraments conferred on him in Ordinations.” Bishop Bena realigned with CANA (Convocation of Anglicans in North America) through the Church of Nigeria; Bishop Fairfield realigned with the Church in Uganda; and no further information is available on Bishop Meeks.

• 2008 — Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori removes Church of England Bishop Henry Scriven (Assistant Pittsburgh) “from the Ordained Ministry of this Church and [is] released from the obligations of all Ministerial offices, and is deprived of the right to exercise the gifts and spiritual authority as a Minister of God’s Word and Sacraments conferred on him in Ordinations.” As a validly ordained Church of England bishop The Episcopal Church Presiding Bishop has no canonical authority to renounce his Holy Orders.

• 2008 — The Episcopal House of Bishops voted to depose Bishop Robert Duncan (VII Pittsburgh) for “his actions over recent months and years constitute ‘Abandonment of the Communion of this Church.'”

• 2008 — Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori removed and released Bishop William Wantland (IV Eau Claire) from the ordained ministry of The Episcopal Church following his realignment with the Southern Cone.

• 2008 — Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori deposed Bishop Jack Iker (III Fort Worth) for Abandonment of Communion following his realignment with the Southern Cone.

• 2008 — The Episcopal House of Bishops deposes two of their own — Bishop John- David Schofield (IV San Joaquin) and Bishop William Cox (Maryland Suffragan) for Abandonment of Communion of the Church in violation of Canon IV.9.2.

• 2009 TEC-San Joaquin — Bishop Jerry Lamb (I Provisional TEC-San Joaquin) deposed total of 61 active and retired clergy charging them with “Abandonment of the Communion.”

• 2009 — Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori deposes Bishop Keith Ackerman (VIII Quincy) following his desire to minster in the Southern Cone Diocese of Bolivia. In her reply to Bishop Ackerman’s request she wrote “As you know, there is no provision for transferring a bishop to another Province. I am therefore releasing you from the obligations of ordained ministry in this Church.”

• 2009 Tonawanda, New York — Bishop Michael Garrison (X Western New York) deposes five clergy — three priests and two deacons — from St. Bartholomew’s Anglican Church for realigning with the Anglican Church in North America.

• 2009 TEC-Pittsburgh — TEC-Pittsburgh Diocesan Standing Committee seeking as a compassionate pastoral solution for the nearly 100 clergy who followed Bishop Robert Duncan (VII Pittsburgh) into the Southern Cone, the realigning clergy were simply released from their “their ministerial ties to The Episcopal Church so that they can become licensed in any entity they choose.”

• 2009 TEC-Quincy — Bishop John Buchanan (I Provisional TEC-Quincy) deposed 34 priests and deacons, claiming that they had renounced their ministries in The Episcopal Church and declaring that those clergy are now deprived of all the authority conveyed in ordination.

• 2010 Baton Rouge, LA — Bishop Morris K. Thompson (XI Louisiana) inhibited Fr. Townsend Waddill rector of St. Margaret’s Episcopal Church for accepting the rectorship at St. Michael’s Anglican Church an ACNA congregation in Ridgecrest, CA.

• 2010 TEC-Fort Worth — Bishop Wallis Ohl (II Provisional TEC-Fort Worth) deposed 57 Anglican Church in North America clergy charging them with violating Episcopal Church Canon IV.10.1 the “Abandonment of Communion of The Episcopal Church.”

• 2011 Boston MA — Bishop Thomas Shaw (XV Massachusetts) performs marriage rites for Episcopal Divinity School Dean Katherine Ragsdale and Massachusetts Canon to the Ordinary Mally Lloyd. Both lesbians are Episcopal priests. They were the first lesbian clergy couple to be married by a bishop.

• 2011 Fargo ND — The V. Rev. Steven Sellers, Dean of Gethsemane Episcopal Cathedral, renounces his orders to become Roman Catholic.

• 2012 Diocese of Pennsylvania — With the tightening of Title IV Canons dealing with a canonical process for reconciling or dissolving a diocese’s relationship with the bishop, and seeing the handwriting on the wall, Pennsylvania’s Bishop Charles Bennison, Jr. (XV Pennsylvania) announced his early retirement rather than again be forced into leaving the diocese. He was due to retire in November 2015.

• 2012 — Nine Episcopal bishops were brought up on Title IV disciplinary charges for supporting the realigned dioceses of Fort Worth and Quincy in court. Bishop Edward L. Salmon (XIII South Carolina); Bishop Peter Beckwith (X Springfield); and Bishop Bruce MacPherson (III Western Louisiana) were in violation because they signed affidavits in opposition to a motion for Summary Judgment made by representatives of The Episcopal Diocese of Quincy and The Episcopal Church. In addition Bishop Maurice Benitez (VI Texas); Bishop John Howe (III Central Florida) Bishop Bruce MacPherson (III Western Louisiana); Bishop James Stanton (VI Dallas); Bishop William Love (IX Albany); Bishop Daniel Martins (XI Springfield); and Bishop Paul Lambert (Dallas Suffragan) that they, too, were in violation for their action in filing of Amicus Curiae Brief in the pending appeal in the Supreme Court of Texas in opposition to The Episcopal Diocese of Texas and The Episcopal Church.

• 2012 — Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori citing Canon III. 12.7 released Bishop Mark Lawrence (South Carolina XIV) from Holy Orders claiming that through his actions he renounced his Orders. Her letter of removal states that Bishop Lawrence “is therefore removed from the Ordained Ministry of this Church and released from the obligations of all Ministerial offices, and is deprived of the right to exercise the gifts and spiritual authority as a Minister of God’s Word and Sacraments conferred on him in Ordinations.”

• 2012 — Nine Episcopal bishops who were brought up on Title IV disciplinary charges for supporting the realigned dioceses of Fort Worth and Quincy in court litigations were censured and forced to sign a mediated Accord where they regret any harm their actions brought to Bishop Wallis Ohl (II Provisional Fort Worth); Bishop Rayford High (III Provisional Fort Worth); Bishop Dorsey McConnell (VIII Pittsburgh); Bishop Kenneth Price (Provisional Pittsburgh); Bishop John Buchanan (Provisional Quincy); and Bishop Chester Talton, (II Provisional San Joaquin); support them in their efforts to reorganize their remnant dioceses; affirm that a bishop’s authority is limited by the canons; promise not to again support realigning dioceses against The Episcopal Church; admit theirs in a minority opinion; and pay mediation cots. The chastised Episcopal bishops were: Bishop Edward. Salmon (XIII South Carolina); Bishop Peter Beckwith (X Springfield); Bishop Bruce MacPherson (III Western Louisiana) ; Bishop Maurice Benitez (VI Texas); Bishop John Howe (III Central Florida); Bishop James Stanton (VI Dallas); Bishop William Love (IX Albany); Bishop Daniel Martins (XI Springfield); and Bishop Paul Lambert (Dallas Suffragan).

• 2013 The Episcopal Church IN South Carolina (TECinSC) — Bishop Charles vonRosenberg (I Provisional TECinSC) deposes 103 clergy in the Diocese of South Carolina (DioSC) for Abandonment of The Episcopal Church.

• 2014 — Bishop Eugene Sutton (XIV Maryland) placed Bishop Heather Cook (Maryland Suffragan) under administrative leave following a Dec. 27, 2014 drunken driving hit-and-run accident which leaves a Baltimore bicyclist dead.

• 2015 — In January The Episcopal Church launches Title IV (Canon IV.10: Conduct Unbecoming a Member of the Clergy) proceedings against Bishop Heather Cook (Maryland Suffragan) following a Dec. 27, 2014 drunken driving hit-and-run accident in Baltimore, Maryland which leaves bicyclist Thomas Palermo dead. Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori citing Canon IV.7(3), (4) and IV.17 (2) restricts Maryland Suffragan Bishop Heather Cook’s ministry. Bishop Cook is official deposed on May 2.

• 2016 — Bishop Audrey Scanlan (XI Central Pennsylvania) removes Fr. Howard White as supply priest at St. James-Bedford (Pennsylvania) and restricts his ministry following criminal investigations into allegations of sexual impropriety at St. George’s School-Newport (Rhode Island) and Grace Episcopal Church in Waynesville, NC.

Backlash: the Anglican Realignment

• 1966 — The Foundation for Christian Theology (FCT) was established to defend the Christian Faith as embodied in traditional Anglicanism, defined in Holy Scripture, and enshrined in the historic Book of Common Prayer.

• 1971 — The Coalition for the Apostolic Ministry (CAM) formed by traditionalist Episcopal bishops to educated The Episcopal Church on the essential differences between priesthood and ministry and to defend the Apostolic ministry.

• 1971 — United Episcopal Church of North America (UECNA) is founded as a part of the Continuing Anglican Movement.

• 1973 — The Fellowship of Concerned Churchmen (FCC) founded as a coordinating agent for lay people and clergy concerned about the breakdown of faith and order within The Episcopal Church.

• 1976 — Evangelical and Catholic Mission (ECM) founded to hold line against the rising tide of women’s ordination.

• 1977 St. Louis, MO — The Fellowship of Concerned Churchmen (FCC) hosts the Congress of St. Louis where more than 2,000 Episcopalians and Anglicans gather united in their rejection of theological changes introduced by the Anglican Church of Canada (ACoC) and by the Protestant Episcopal Church in the United States of America (PECUSA) in its General Convention of 1976. The resulting document Affirmation of St. Louis is the foundation document of the Continuing Anglican Movement (CAM) which continues and perseveres Anglicanism’s line of Apostolic Succession as well as historic Anglican belief and practice. Some member jurisdictions include: the Anglican Catholic Church; Anglican Church in America; Anglican Episcopal Church; Anglican Province of America; and Anglican Province of Christ the King.

• 1989 Fort Worth, TX — The Episcopal Synod of America (ESA) was formed when more than 2,000 attended an Evangelical and Catholic Mission (ECM) Synod following Barbara Harris’ (Massachusetts Suffragan) consecrated as the first women bishop in The Episcopal Church and Anglicanism.

• 1989 — The Anglican Mission in the America (AMiA) is formed as a missionary outreach of the Anglican Church in Rwanda. Chuck Murphy is founding Missionary Bishop.

• 1989 — The Episcopal Synod of America (ESA) folds into Forward in Faith International.

• 1994 — Fitzsimmons Allison (XII South Carolina) participates in consecrations of Bishop Charles Murphy and Bishop John Rogers for the Province of Rwanda’s Anglican Mission in America (AMiA). He remains TEC living in South Carolina.

• 1994 — Alex Dickson (I West Tennessee) participates in consecrations of Bishop Charles Murphy and Bishop John Rogers for the Province of Rwanda’s Anglican Mission in America (AMiA).

• 1995 — Bishop Clarence Pope (II Fort Worth) announces his plans to join the Roman Catholic Church over women’s ordination and resigns from the House of Bishops. He returned to The Episcopal Church later in the year. Then in 1998 he again rejoined the Catholic Church for a short time, only to re-return to the Episcopal Church. Then in 2007 he again returned to the Catholic Church only to rerun to The Episcopal fold in 2008. When he died in 2012 he was a member St. Patrick’s Episcopal Church, Zachary, LA. and is buried in the Grace Episcopal Cemetery, St. Francisville, LA. He was also honored by the Anglican Church in North America (ACNA) following his death with a memorial service at St. Vincent’s Cathedral in Bedford, TX.

• 1996 Atlanta, GA — The Confession of Faith and Morality is signed at the “A Place to stand: A Call to Mission” conference.

• 1996 — Concerned Clergy and Laity in the Episcopal Church (CCLEC) formed to discuss problems in The Episcopal Church.

• 1996 — American Anglican Council formed as a network of individuals, parishes, and specialized ministries who affirm biblical authority and Anglican orthodoxy.

• 1997 Pawley’s Island, SC — First Promise formed to reaffirm the Church’s historic teaching on marriage and sexual practice.

• 1997 — The North American Missionary Society (NAMS) begins planting churches in North America.

• 1997 — The Association of Anglican Congregation on Mission (AACOM) is formed as an association of biblically orthodox Anglican, not necessarily Episcopal, congregations.

• 2000 — Archbishop of Canterbury George Carey does not recognize the consecrations of Anglican Mission in American (AMiA) bishops John Rodgers and Chuck Murphy, a stating their “consecrations were irregular.”

• 2000 — Nassau, the Bahamas — A broad-based coalition of Anglican primates, bishops and scholars met following the Episcopal General Convention to discuss the growing state of pastoral emergency in The Episcopal Church sending a letter to Archbishop of Canterbury George Carey about The Episcopal Church’s serious departures from traditional church teaching.

• 2000 — The U.S. Anglican Congress is consortium formed from the leadership of traditional organizations, seminaries, and missionary groups for the formation missionary activity in the Anglican tradition.

• 2001 Hendersonville, NC — Following the Primates’ Meeting Archbishop of Canterbury George Carey admits that The Episcopal Church is “out of step” with the rest of the Anglican Communion on human sexuality and urged orthodox Episcopalians to face the conflict in the Church from within,” bur rejected the formation of a new American Anglican province.

• 2003 — Gene Robinson, a divorced priest openly living in a committed gay relationship, was consecrated as Bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of New Hampshire in the Episcopal Church of the United States. This event precipitated actions by dissenting Episcopal bishops and priests at the diocesan and parish level to disassociate themselves from the Episcopal Church and align themselves with other Primates of the Anglican Communion, including the Primates of Nigeria, Rwanda, and Bolivia. The Archbishop of Canterbury has not recognized such realignments as legitimate.

• 2003 Plano, Texas — The American Anglican Council holds a meeting to respond to General Convention’s which tore the fabric of Anglicanism with an common Evangelical and Catholic voice. Joseph Cardinal Ratzinger (the future Pope Benedict XVI) sent letter of support of “the unity which is found in truth.” More than 4000 attended the opening Eucharist. The Plano meeting resulted in the formation of the Network of Anglican Communion Dioceses and Parishes (NACDP).

• 2003 Canterbury, England — In the wake of the confirmation non celibate homosexual Vicky Gene Robinson as bishop and the practice of same-sex blessings in the Anglican Church of Canada (ACoC) Archbishop of Canterbury Rowan Williams called for an emergency meeting of Anglican primates to address the situation. The Lambeth Commission on Communion was established to work through the various issues which resulted in The Windsor Report.

• 2003 — The Federation for Anglican Ministry in America is formed to begin a common commitment to do mission collaboratively via the federation.

• 2004 — The exodus began of clergy and congregations seeking episcopal pastoral oversight from non-Episcopal Church provinces.

• 2004 — Anglican Communion Network founded as a theologically conservative network of Anglican and Episcopalian dioceses and parishes in the United States working toward Anglican realignment.

• 2004 — .Anglican Global Mission Partners formed to be the mission arm of the Anglican Communion Network brining together the Episcopal Partnership for Global Mission (EPGM) with other independent mission endeavors.

• 2004 — The Common Cause Partnership is formed to “to make common cause for the gospel of Jesus Christ and common cause for a united, missionary and orthodox Anglicanism in North America.” Founding member organizations include: the Anglican Communion Network (ACN); Reformed Episcopal Church (REC); Anglican Mission in America (AMiA); Forward in Faith North America (FiF-NA); Convocation of Anglicans in North America (CANA); the Anglican Province of America (APA); and the American Anglican Council (AAC); the Anglican Coalition in Canada ; Anglican Essentials – Canada; Anglican Network in Canada.

• 2004 — The Windsor Report was released but it had not teeth. The report did not adopt a view on homosexual practice, but nevertheless recommended a moratorium on further consecrations of actively homosexual bishops and public Rites of Blessing of same-sex unions. It stopped short of recommending discipline against the Episcopal Church or the Anglican Church of Canada.

• 2005 — William Cox (Maryland-suffragan) ordains two priests and a deacon in the Diocese of Kansas for the Province of the Church of Uganda. He goes to the Southern Cone in 2007.

• 2006 — Katharine Jefferts Schori (III Nevada) was invested at the Washington National Cathedral as the new presiding bishop of the Episcopal Church in the USA. Her election is a point of division within some provinces of the Anglican Communion, which does not universally accept the ordination of women. Several Episcopal dioceses, including Fort Worth, Dallas, Quincy, Pittsburgh, San Joaquin, South Carolina, Central Florida, Albany, and Springfield seek Alternative Primatial Oversight (APO).

• 2006 — Convocation of Anglicans in North America, a missionary arm of the Anglican Church in Nigeria is formed. Martyn Minns is elected as founding missionary bishop.

• 2006 — Federation of Anglican Churches in the Americas (FACA) to provide a vehicle for communication, fellowship, and cooperation between the various Anglican jurisdictions in the Americas.

• 2006 Primates’ Meeting — Seven Global South Anglican primates refused to take Communion because of the presence of Katharine Jefferts Schori the Presiding Bishop and Primate of The Episcopal Church in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. The primates were: Peter Akinola(Nigeria); John Chew (Southeast Asia); Benjamin Nzimbi (Kenya); Justice Akrofi (West Africa) Henry Orombi (Uganda,) Gregory Venables (the Southern Cone) and Emmanuel Kolini ( Rwanda).

• 2006 Primates’ Meeting — A total of 15 Anglican primates of the 38 Anglican primates missed the Dublin, Ireland meeting, in part due to the presence of Katharine Jefferts Schroi the Presiding Bishop and Primate of The Episcopal Church and the continued liberalization of The Episcopal Church. The primates who did not attend for various reasons were: Eliud Wabukala (Kenya); Purely Lyngdoh, (North India); Valentino Mokiwa (Tanzania); Daniel Deng Bul Yak (the Sudan); Onesphore Rwaje (Rwanda); Ian Ernest (the Indian Ocean); Mouneer Anis (Egypt); Nicholas Okoh ( Nigeria); Henry Orombi (Uganda); John Chew (South East Asia); Hector Zavala (the Southern Cone); and Justice Ofei Akrofi (West Africa). Also: Henry Isingoma ( the Congo); Carlos Touche-Porter (Mexico); and Stephen Than Myint Oo (Burma).

• 2006 Canterbury, England — The Archbishop of Canterbury Rowan Williams called for the drafting of an Anglican Covenant and established the Covenant Design Group to complete the task.

• 2007 — Episcopal Diocese of San Joaquin realigns with the Southern Cone.

• 2008 — The Episcopal dioceses of Pittsburgh, Fort Worth and Quincy realign with the Southern Cone

• 2008 Wheaton, IL — Constitutional Convention held for the founding of Anglican Church in North America (ACNA) as a separate ecclesiastical structure in North America for faithful Anglicans. The founding partners include: American Anglican Council (AAC); The Anglican Coalition in Canada (ACiC); The Anglican Communion Network (ACN); Anglican Mission in the Americas (ACiA); Anglican Network in Canada (ANiC); Convocation of Anglicans in North America (CANA); Forward in Faith North America (USA); Reformed Episcopal Church (REC); Missionary Convocation of Kenya; Missionary Convocation of the Southern Cone; and Missionary Convocation of Uganda.

• 2008 Jerusalem, Israel — The first Global Anglican Future Conference (CAFCON) met to address the rise of secularism in the church and also called for the creation of the Anglican Church in North America (ACNA) as an alternative to the Episcopal Church in the United States and the Anglican Church of Canada and declared that recognition by the Archbishop of Canterbury is not necessary to Anglican identity.

• 2009 Plano, TX — Archbishop Robert Duncan, the force behind the founding of Anglican Church in North America (ACNA) is enthroned as first primate

• 2009 — The Anglican Province of Nigeria declared itself in communion with the Anglican Church in North America (ACNA); the Diocese of Sydney, Australia, welcomed the ACNA and declared its desire to be in full communion with it; Church of the Province of Uganda declared itself in communion with ACNA .

• 2009 — The Fellowship of Confessing Anglicans (FCA) recognizes the Anglican Church in North America (ANCA).

• 2009 — Pope Benedict XVI propagates apostolic constitution Anglicanorum Coetibus to allow for the creation of personal Ordinariates for Episcopalians and Anglicans to return in full communion with the Church of Rome to retain certain elements of their Anglican patrimony including Anglicanized worship and in some cases a married priesthood.

• 2009 Catonsville, MD — All Saints Sister of the Poor, an Episcopal religious order of women, become Roman Catholic.

• 2010 — Archbishop Ian Ernest of the Province of the Indian Ocean chair of the Council of Anglican Provinces of Africa breaks communion with the Episcopal Church and the Anglican Church of Canada “until such time as they reverse their theological innovations.”

• 2010 — The Church of England (CofE) , the Mother church of Anglicanism, falls short seeking full communion with the Anglican Church in North America (ACNA); instead the CofE Synod simply recognized the desire of ACNA to remain within the “Anglican Family.”

• 2011 — PEAR-USA the North American missionary district of the Anglican Church in Rwanda is established after the breakup of the Anglican Mission in America (AMiA) with Province de l’Eglise Anglicane au Rwanda (PEAR).

• 2011 — The Communion Partners, an Episcopal community bishops and clergy partners in Anglican mission, was formed to maintain and strengthen ties with the Anglican Communion, maintain fidelity to the canonical realities, integrities and structures of the Episcopal Church, and to exercise of ministerial office as a focus of unity.

• 2012 — The Personal Ordinariate of the Chair of St. Peter was erected by Pope Benedict XVI for former Episcopalians and Anglicans in the United States and Canada seeking full communion with the Church of Rome. Former Episcopal Bishop Jeffery Steenson (V Rio Grande) was named the founding Ordinary and given the rank of a protonotary apostolic monsignor.

• 2012 — The Diocese of South Carolina disaffiliates with The Episcopal Church as an extraterritorial Anglican diocese

• 2013 — The Episcopal Diocese of Quincy (1877-2013) was reabsorbed by its parent Diocese of Chicago to become the Peoria Deanery.

• 2013 Nairobi, Kenya — GAFCON II is held. Forward in Faith-North America and ACNA send delegates. GAFCON is committed to the work of reforming, reshaping and renewing global Anglicanism and to recognize and encourage faithful Anglicans in regions of the world where there is no biblical Anglican voice or presence.

• 2013 — The American Anglican Fellowship files Title IV presentment charges against Katharine Jefferts Schori for violating various canons as Presiding Bishop.

• 2014 — Foley Beach is elected as the second Archbishop of the Anglican Church in North America. He was the founding bishop of the Anglican Diocese of the South.

• 2015 — Forward in Faith-North America hold the International Catholic Congress of Anglicans in Fort Worth, Texas. The first such congress held since the 1920s in England.

• 2015 — Canon Lawrence Bausch takes over the presidency of Forward in Faith- North America. Bishop Keith Ackerman had been FiF-NA’s president since 2005.

• 2015 — Pope Francis names Monsignor Steven Lopez as the Ordinariate of the Chair of St. Peter’s first bishop as Monsignor Jeffery Steenson, the Ordinariate’s founding Ordinary, steps down to pursue academic endeavors. Steenson was formerly the Bishop of the Rio Grande before he converted to Roman Catholicism.

• 2016 –The Anglican Communion primates gathered at Lambeth to find a way to deal with the brokenness of the Communion. ACNA Archbishop Foley Beach was invited and had a voice and vote in the proceedings. The Primates’ called for the disciplining of The Episcopal Church were for a three year period of time TEC would not be able to have representatives on ecumenical and interfaith bodies and TEC should not be appointed or elected to an internal standing committee and can only have voice but may not vote in the Instruments of Communion.

• 2016 –TEC rejects the Primates’ sanctions and attends ACC 16 the Anglican Consultative Council in Lusaka, Zambia excising for participation voice and vote. The Anglican Provinces of Uganda, Rwanda and Nigeria refused to send delegations because TEC would be in attendance. The Province of Kenya covertly sent a representation against the expressed desire of Archbishop Eliud Wabukala. Archbishop Mouneer Anis of Egypt also refused to attend and he is a member of the Primates’ Standing Committee.

Episcopal Bishops who have left TEC

• 1976 — Albert Chambers (VII Springfield) leaves to found the Anglican Continuum. RIP: 1993

• 1991 — Bishop Donald Davies (I Fort Worth) leaves to form the Episcopal Missionary Church and become its first presiding bishop. RIP: 2011

• 1991 — Charles Boynton (New York-suffragan) leaves for the Traditional Anglican Communion. RIP 1999

• 1994 — Clarence Pope (II Fort Worth) leaves to go to Rome, returns in 1995 only to go back to the Catholic Church in 2007 but again return to Anglicanism in 2008. RIP 2012 At death he was honored by both The Episcopal Church and the Anglican Church in North America (ACNA).

• 2007 — Daniel Herzog (VIII Albany) leaves to go to Rome returns in 2010.

• 2007 — John Lipscomb (IV Southwest Florida) becomes Catholic priest and is spiritual director of the Bethany Catholic Retreat Center in Lutz, Florida.

• 2007 — Mark MacDonald (VII Alaska) leave to go to the Anglican Church of Canada as the National Indigenous Anglican Bishop

• 2007 — Jeffrey Steenson (VIII Rio Grande) leaves to go to Rome. He becomes the founding Ordinary of the Personal Ordinariate of the Chair of St. Peter.

• 2007 — Andrew Fairfield (X North Dakota) leaves to realign with the Province of Uganda. Later he becomes a member of the ACNA College of Bishops.

• 2007 — William Cox (Maryland-suffragan) leaves to realign with the Southern Cone. He is quietly living in Oklahoma.

• 2007 — William Wantland (IV Eau Claire) leaves to realign with the Southern Cone. He later becomes a founding bishop of the ACNA College of Bishops

• 2007 — John-David Schofield (IV San Joaquin) realigns diocese realign with the Southern Cone. He later becomes a founding bishop of the ACNA College of Bishops.

• 2007 — David Bena (Albany-Suffragan) leaves to realign with the CANA through the Province of Nigeria. He later be becomes a member of the ACNA College of Bishops.

• 2008 — Robert Duncan Duncan (VII Pittsburgh) realigns diocese with the Southern Cone. He becomes the driving force behind the creation of Anglican Church in North America (ACNA) and becomes the first primate.

• 2007 — Jack Iker (III Fort Worth) realigns diocese with the Southern Cone. He later becomes a founding bishop of the ACNA College of Bishops

• 2008 — Terence Kelshaw (VII Rio Grande) leaves to realign with the Anglican Church in Uganda He later becomes a part of the ACNA College of Bishops. RIP 2015

• 2008 — Henry Scriven (Pittsburgh -Assistant) leaves to return to the Church of England.

• 2009 — David Bane (IX Southern Virginia) leaves to realign with the Southern Cone. He later becomes a part of the ACNA College of Bishops. He returned to The Episcopal Church in 2015.

• 2009 — Edward MacBurney (VII Quincy) leaves to realign with the Anglican Church in North America. He later becomes a part of the ACNA College of Bishops.

• 2009 — Keith Ackerman (Quincy VIII) leaves to realign with the Diocese of Bolivia. He later becomes a member of the ACNA College of Bishops.

• 2012 — Mark Lawrence (XIV South Carolina) realigns diocese as an independent Anglican diocese. The Diocese eventually came under the spiritual headship of GACFON. Diocese is in current deliberations with ACNA.

• 2012 — Alden Hathaway (VI Pittsburgh) remains with St. Helena’s Episcopal Church Beaufort, SC, as Bishop-in-Resident when the Diocese of South Carolina is realigned as an independent Anglican diocese.

• 2012 — Alex Dickson (I West Tennessee) remains with St. Michael’s Episcopal Church , Charleston, SC, as Bishop-in-Resident when the Diocese of South Carolina is realigned as an independent Anglican diocese.

• 2014 — Peter Beckwith (X Springfield) leaves to realign ACNA. He becomes a member of the ACNA College of Bishops.

Notable Quotes

• 1986 — Presiding Bishop Edmond Browning: “I encourage The Episcopal Church to gain greater perspective on homosexuality and to explode and transcend the myths and phobias which impede out common life.” Quoted in The Witness.

• 1987 — Bishop John Spong (VIII Newark): “I covet for all people the joy of being sustained in the fullness of a relationship that unites two persons in mind, body and spirit, even when that relationship has not been blessed with a service called holy matrimony.” Quoted in The Los Angeles Times

• 1987 — Presiding Bishop Edmond Browning: “I don’t think a person’s sexuality should be determinant about whether that person can or should not be ordained.” Quoted in The Living Church.

• 1989 — Episcopal House of Bishops Statement: “Within the Anglican Communion, and indeed even within our own church, there is not a common theological mind or agreed practice on the matter of the ordination of women.” Quoted in The Living Church

• 1989 — Bishop Barbara Harris (Suffragan Massachusetts “I certainly don’t want to be one of the boys. I want to offer my peculiar gifts as a black woman … a sensitivity and an awareness that comes out of more than a passing acquaintance with oppression. ” Quoted in US News & World Report “The first of the ‘mitered mamas'” by Lynn Rosellini

• 1989 — “Since her election, Harris has seemed to be on notably good behavior, her utterances toned down since the days when she railed against conservative elements in the church, calling them ‘Podunk Episcopalians’ who were afraid of ‘mitered mamas’.” Quoted by Betty Cuniberti in The Los Angeles Times.

• 1990 — Bishop Alexander ‘Muge (Diocese of Eldoret – Kenya, Africa) : ” …homosexuals and lesbians have taken over the church leadership in the USA and there is no way God is going to bless this church with growth.” Quoted in The Living Church

• 1990 — Episcopal House of Bishops’ Statement: “We are not of a single mind in our understanding of the demands of Holy Scripture, of faithful obedience to tradition or informed awareness of actual lives and choices faced by homosexual men and women.” Quoted in The Living Church

• 1990 — Using Integrity -USA research Bishop John Spong (VIII Newark) told House of Bishops interim meeting: “50 priests who have been ordained since 1979 who are willing to state publically that when they were ordained, the ordaining bishop knew they were homosexual and not celibate.” Quoted in The Living Church

• 1990 — Bishop Frederick Borsch (V Los Angeles): “It’s [homosexual ordination] an issue of diocesan rights. We [bishops] feel we are competent to decide who is fit for ordination.” Quoted in The Living Church.

• 1991 — Bishop Ronald Haines (VII Washington) “When a candidate has persistently displayed strength, leadership, spirituality, intellect, moral understanding and commitment to Christ, reservation regarding the candidate’s sexuality and lifestyle should not be an absolute bar to ordination.” Quoted in The New York Times

• 1992 — Bishop Theodore Eastman (XII Maryland): “What is happening here (a same-sex blessing), of course, is being repeated in other dioceses of this church as well as other denominations as well.” Quoted in The Living Church

• 1992 –The Standing Commission on Human Affairs: “In this Decade of Evangelism, we seem intent on alienating and keeping out one of the few identifiable groups of people [LGBT] who want to be welcomed in.” Quoted in Religious Tolerance

• 1994 — Lesbian priest Jennifer Walters: ” .. my sexuality makes my experience and the church’s experience richer …” Quoted in The Living Church

• 1995 — Bishop John Spong (VIII Newark): “I believe that the burial and empty tomb stories [of the Resurrection] are pure legend. Every detail is confused; yet on that basis the Christian Church was born.” Quoted from Diocese of Newark Convention address

• 1995 — Presiding Bishop Edmond Browning: “We have been diverted by far, and let me name it — hate. It is time to move past using literalistic reading of the Bible to create prejudices against our gay and lesbian brothers and sisters. Biblical literalism may be someone’s tradition, but it’s not our tradition, and it’s time we came home to our Anglican roots.” Quoted in The Living Church

• 2000 — Soulforce Chairman Jimmy Creech to Episcopal General Convention: “Open your arms; open your doors; open your hearts. Stop the debate. Be faithful to the Gospel of Jesus Christ.” Quoted in Religious Tolerance

• 2000 — Gay comment following General Convention: ‘Pastoral care’ for couples without sacramental celebration is a meaningless endeavor for the church. Social service agencies can provide pastoral care.” Quoted in Religious Tolerance

• 2000 — Integrity-USA comment following General Convention: “… the question is no longer whether our [LGBT] relationships exist or are of God. The question is how they should be celebrated.” Quoted in Religious Tolerance

• 2003 — The Episcopal House of Bishops Theology Committee: “As Christians, we affirm that persons of all sexual orientations are created in the image of God and they are full members of the human family. We believe it is imperative that The Episcopal Church refrain from any attempt to settle the matter legislatively. For a season at least, we must acknowledge and live the great pain and discomfort of our disagreements.” Quoted in Religious Tolerance

• 2006 — Presiding Bishop-elect Katharine Jefferts Schori: ” Our Mother Jesus gives birth to a new creation — and you and I are His children.” Quoted from her General Convention Closing Eucharist sermon

• 2007 — American Anglican Council President Bishop David Anderson: “The Global South and their 40 million congregants refuse to sit by and watch The Episcopal Church (TEC) defy Communion agreements and legally persecute those U.S. parishes that wish to remain faithful to the Gospel and church teaching,” Quoted by Christian Today

• 2009 — Kate Moorehead rector of St. James Episcopal Church, Wichita, Kansas on General Convention: “I am afraid we are becoming a church of a fundamentalist left,” Quoted in The Los Angeles Times

• 2009 — American journalist David Virtue on General Convention: “It’s a clean sweep for the liberal agenda in the Episcopal Church. The orthodox are finished.” Quoted on Albert Mohler blog

• 2009 — Fr. Michael Heidt on The Episcopal Church’s General Convection’s UTO Ingathering “This is a pagan celebration, it is not good for your soul. Leave.” Quoted on Virtue Online

• 2009 — Bishop Mary Glasspool (Los Angeles Suffragan): “I’ve committed my life as a life of service to the people of Jesus Christ, and what hurts is the sense that anybody might have that my name or my servanthood could be perceived as divisive.” Quoted in Pink News

• 2011 — Sister Canon Mary Michael Simpson, OSH: “Many people — men as well as women — say that though they themselves don’t want to be ordained, it means so much to them to have me at the altar. ‘It means that the church really accepts me — I’m not a second-class citizen.'” Quoted from her obituary in The New York Times

• 2012 — Episcopal Divinity School Dean Katherine Ragsdale: “When a woman gets pregnant against her will and wants an abortion — it’s the violence that is the tragedy; the abortion is a blessing.” Quoted from the US House of Representatives Judiciary Subcommittee on the Constitution testimony on the Child Interstate Abortion Notification Act

• 2013 — Bishop Thomas Shaw, SSJE (XV (Massachusetts); “I know that I rejoice with many Episcopalians of our diocese in eastern Massachusetts and across The Episcopal Church because of the Supreme Court’s decision today [June 26] that the Defense of Marriage Act is unconstitutional. We here in Massachusetts, the first state to allow same-sex marriage, have long experienced the contributions that gay and lesbian married couples and their families make to our society and to our church …” Quoted by the Episcopal News Service

• 2013 — National Cathedral Director of Liturgy Rev. Canon Gina Gilland Campbell in welcoming Muslims to use the National Cathedral for their Friday Jumu’ah prayer service : “Salaam, shalom, peace. You are all so very welcome here. Let us stretch our hearts and let us seek to deepen mercy for we worship the same God.” Quoted by WRC-TV 4 News

• 2014 — Jennifer Hughes, a professor of history at the University of California-Riverside: “I was never a lapsed Catholic. I’ve begun to think of myself, and to speak of myself, as a Roman Catholic woman ordained in the Episcopal Church.” Quoted by The Christian Science Monitor.

• 2014 — Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori upon hearing that the Church of England’s General Synod has voted to consecrate female bishops: “I am overjoyed for the Church of England as it has finally consented to the ordination and consecration of women as bishops. I believe that the inclusion of women in this order will bring new gifts and possibilities for its partnership in God’s mission in England. This represents one more step in the long transformation of church and society toward the Reign of God.” Quoted by the Episcopal News Service

• 2015 — In an open letter by Bishop Vicky Gene Robinson (IX New Hampshire) Pope Francis the Episcopal bishop refers to the Roman Pontiff as “brother bishop.” Quoted by The Daily Beast

• 2015 — Groton School Chaplain Danielle Tumminio: “When I heard a federal judge struck down part of Utah’s polygamy law last week, I gave a little squeal of delight. To be clear, I’m an Episcopal priest, not a polygamist.” Quoted by CNN

Mary Ann Mueller is research assistant and correspondent for VIRTUEONLINE the most widely read orthodox Anglican Online News Service in the Anglican Communion. This story may be freely distributed with full acknowledgement as to its source. Original link: http://virtueonline.org/liberation-theology-episcopal-church-usa-1970-2016

3 thoughts on “Liberation Theology in The Episcopal Church USA: 1970-2016

  1. Does the Bible really say that homosexuality is sinful? is a discussion on the ClubAdventist forum. One of the participants arguing that certain texts have been misinterpreted is a Mr. Wetmore, listed at http://www.adventistlawyer.com/article/2/about-us as working in the GC’s office of general counsel.

    The posts I made concerning the propriety of someone in that office publicly making such arguments were removed. Why they were removed was never explained, nor was I told that they were removed.

    So certainly there are indications out there that the Adventist Church is going to have to face controversy over these issues too.

    Reply
  2. This is not controversy but Satan’s spirits from Rev.16:13 entering the Church and trying to dissolve the borders between holy and secular.
    Indeed Homosexuality is the sin, just look at Lev.18:22

    Reply
  3. Isn’t this amazing, how Satan have gotten many of the churches that proclaim that they are following the word of”GOD” not realizing that the Gospel of Jesus Christ that they are preaching from, is a Worldly gospel of Jesus Christ, that’s got no “Power” to it at all…. None!
    It doesn’t have the power to “Rebuke” or Cast Out, or to bring Healing to those that are Sick! “Faith” does not exist in This counterfeit gospel of “Jesus Christ! Omitting entirely what is written in Luke 10:19 or what is needed for everyone thats written down in the book of Hebrews 11:6
    As it is written in the true Gospel. JESUS” said Wherefore by their fruits ye shall know them.
    Not every one that saith unto me, Lord, Lord, shall enter into the kingdom of heaven; but he that doeth the will of my Father which is in heaven. Mathew 7:20,21

    These churches, if you can call them that, obviously don’t realize that “You Cannot Serve “GOD” Anyway You Want Too and Survive The Second Coming Of “JESUS CHRIST”!

    Reply

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